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Last Post 01/20/2010 8:56 PM by  conbon
Bryan's bike thread
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Bryan S
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02/03/2008 5:30 PM

    Carl, bike question for you. I'm in the market for a road bike. Any recommendations for something in the $1,000 to $1,500 price range? I haven't had a road bike for more than ten years. Most of my biking of late has been urban and park trails stuff on my mountain bike. The plan is to ride the MS 150 this fall with the team we have from work.

    I'm used to car shopping: look at the manufacturers, their reputation and performance, then consider the subjective things like styling and features.

    For the bike its a bit maddening since so many of the components are the same. I've concluded that its all about fit and personal comfort, then components, then the relationship with the shop. I've kind of concluded that I'd prefer Shimano 105 components over Tiagra or Sora. In my area I've looked at Big Shark (Canondale Synapse 6), Maplewood (Lemond Tourmelet and Tek Pilot 2.1)and the Hub Giant OCR and Scott Speedster). All three have been very helpfull, now I need to make a decision, so what's your opinion...I know you probably have one[:)]

    carl_aka_carlos
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    02/03/2008 7:57 PM

    It really does all boil down to fit, especially since you've already expressed that you want at least 105 level components. 

     

    Personally, I ride LeMonds because they fit me the best (currently I have both a Tourmalet and Victoire).  Since I race for Manchester Racing Club/Trek St. Louis of course I'm going to suggest a LeMond or a Trek.  It looks like you'd get a better deal with the Pilot vs the Tourmalet.  Apparently LeMond has upgraded the frame with carbon fibre seat stays, but then downgraded from full 105 to a 105/Tiagra mix.  The Pilot has full Ultegra.  Liquigas has long been using the Synapse 6 for Paris-Roubaix, so it's a bike that can take some abuse while providing a degree of vertical compliance.  Giant's and Scott's are the two brands I have no experience with, although I can tell you that Scott is basically want Cannondale used to be (the founders of Cannondale started Scott).  Giants don't usually offer many sizes, so that is something to consider.

     

    The other factor you have to consider is that you might want to invest in a different saddle, seatpost, and stem so that you'll get the best fit possible, so you might want to look at a bike that comes in below your pricepoint so you have some cash to spend on the accesories (I've never bought a bike and ridden it, as-is, off the shelf, but I'm also not your average american male and I'm kind of hard to fit).

     

    Most important is whether or not the bike fits you properly.  Don't know what format of the MS150 you'll be doing (short, medium, long) but you'll want a bike that you'll be comfortable on for at least 3 hours.  My all Aluminum Tourmalet really starts to pound me after 3.5 hours in the saddle, where as my carbon fibre Victoire is smooth as butter mile after mile.  Whatever shop you go with, make sure that they'll let you exchange the bike for a different model if you end up not being comfortable on it/not being able to get the right fit.  Sometimes, even after a professional fitting in a shop, you just need to make small adjustments once you get out on the roads.


    The MS150 seems to always be scheduled the same weekend as a USA Cycling race, so I haven't been able to get out and participate. 

    Bryan S
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    02/05/2008 1:52 PM

    Any more bike posts on the health thread and Chris will make me change my signiture to "D.B. Cooper"

    christoc
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    02/05/2008 2:24 PM
    You had thread jacked enough :) It wasn't a health thread, but a Health Competition thread!
    Vibe
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    02/05/2008 10:04 PM
    Check out "off brands".  Components are the same, as you mentioned and a lot of frames come from the same factories.  Avoiding a name like Trek (thanks Lance), can get you the same bike for hundreds less.  I went w/ a Marin Portofino a few years ago.  Still a reputable company but w/o the big name and advertising.  Avoiding the biggies allowed me to get a frame w/ carbon fiber rear stays and a carbon front fork, compared to standard frames for the same price.  I also own a Trek so i've played both ways.  My Trek is on it's fourth drivetrain due to wear.  I would definately find a good frame, and a comfortable fit and worry about the components later, as they can, and will, (if you ride the bike) be replaced.
    conbon
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    01/20/2010 8:56 PM
    Everybody at my shop rides Specialized, but we also carry Trek and Giant...so maybe that shows you something. I ride a Stumpjumper and I used to have an Epic, manager rides a Roubaix, Cyclosross, Langster, and a Rockhopper single speed, one co-worker rides a Stumpjumper and a Tarmac, another rides a Transition, another rides a Roubaix, another rides an Epic, and the owner rides a Cyclocross and a Trek Project One, but thats like the only non-Specialized bike in our shop. Everybody used to ride either treks or giants, but most of us made the switch within the last year.

    I'd suggest you come look around at South County Cyclery. Not only do we have a great selection of Specialized's, but we carry a bunch of those other brands too.

    -Connor
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